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June 21, 2021
by quiparle_admin
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Issue 30.1 (June 2021) Is Now Available at Duke University Press!

Announcing Volume 30, No. 1 of qui parle, now available through Duke University Press and Project Muse.

Articles:

  • William Morgan and Kyra Sutton, Networks of Belief: An Introduction
  • Aaron Frederick Eldridge, Movement in Repose: Notes on Form of Life
  • Alex Dubilet, An Immanence without the World: On Dispossession, Nothingness, and Secularity
  • Carina Albrecht, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, and Laura Kurgan, Living In/difference; or, How to Imagine Ambivalent Networks
  • Brett Zehner, A Liar’s Epistemology: Herbert Simon’s Performative Artificial Intelligence
  • Matteo Pasquinelli, How to Make a Class: Hayek’s Neoliberalism and the Origins of Connectionism
  • Luciana Parisi and William Morgan, What Is (Machine) Philosophy?

Special Dossier: Breath

  • Jeffrey Moro, Collective Tissue
  • Daryl Maude, Grass-Colored Air: Breathing with Osaki Midori
  • Jeffrey Moro, Collective Tissue
  • Daryl Maude, Grass-Colored Air: Breathing with Osaki Midori
  • Maria José de Abreu, The Anti-giraffe
  • Kathleen Cruz Gutierrez, A Philippine Asphyxia
  • Peter Myers, as I take my seat…
  • Kimberley Bain, Groan

March 29, 2021
by quiparle_admin
Comments Off on Call for Papers: “The Paranormative”

Call for Papers: “The Paranormative”

One year later, a “return to normal” remains the pandemic’s most enduring political promise, a token of hope to hedge against continued death and precarity. Held within this recursive promise, however, is a prima facie condition that deserves interrogation. What, exactly, is the “normal” to which we will return? Will capitalism and its attendant crises no longer demand our attention absent a continual state of emergency? The coherence and stability of the “normal” eludes us; Georges Canguilhem sees the normal as itself a chimeric category, one which, from the perspective of medicine and science, is not so distant from the “pathological” it is meant to foil.

In the contemporary moment, what we might term “paranormativity” has further infringed upon our so-called norms, unfolding in internet circles, blue-chip art institutions, and scenes of communal mourning. With the popular renewal of astrological, mystical, and pagan practices and discourses, we are witnessing a contemporary cultural demand for paranormal knowledge that exceeds the epistemological limitations of the secular. In recent years, these limitations have motivated critical attention to studies in metaphysics and non-western approaches to knowledge. Scholars such as M. Jacqui Alexander, Jeffrey Sconce, Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley, Harry Garuba, Jefferey Kripal and many others have helped shape a field that resists the transformation of the paranormal into a symbolic register, turning instead to events and phenomena that defy the assumptive principles of common sense or reasoning. In some traditions, the spirit world has long been connected to political resistance: of the Haitian revolution, scholar C.L.R. James wrote that “[v]oodoo [sic] was the medium of the conspiracy.” Qui Parle 31.1 invites paper submissions that consider the imponderable in relation to the normative: animism, aliens, hallucinations, UFOs, psychics, spirit mediums, miracles, mystics, and more. We are interested in works that treat their subjects with seriousness and avoid exoticism, attending to forms of life that do not return to ‘the normal’ but stage its undoing. As more and more in our shared present turn to the paranormal, we ask: to what extent can the “paranormative” resist capital and white supremacy, and to what extent is even the shifting ground of the normal open to commodification?

We encourage submissions from across all disciplines. Proposals on, but not limited to, the following topics are welcome:

  • Ghosts, spirits, jinn and animist cosmologies
  • Rapturous or ecstatic experiences
  • A consideration of para- (to the side, shifted) and (what is) normative
  • Mediation, haunted media, spirit mediums, dead media
  • Astrology; its detractors and contemporary resurgence
  • Aliens, UFOs
  • Hallucinations
  • Cults
  • The non-normative amount of death we have faced amid the pandemic
  • Magic/magic tricks
  • Mircales
  • Debunking
  • Spiritual dimensions of political resistance
  • Possession / exorcism
  • Conspiracy theories, hoaxes
  • The embrace of mystical artists in the art world and their subsequent capitalist appropriation

Please send an abstract of 300 words and, in a separate document, a brief author bio to quiparlejournal@gmail.com by April 30, 2021. If accepted, full papers will be due on October 1.


References:

Alexander, M. Jacqui, Judith Halberstam, and Lisa Lowe. Pedagogies of Crossing: Meditations on Feminism, Sexual Politics, Memory, and the Sacred. Durham: Duke University Press, 2006.

Canguilhem, Georges. On The Normal and the Pathological. Trans. Carolyn R. Fawcett. Dordrecht, Holland: D. Reidel Publishing Company, 1978.

Garuba, Harry. “Explorations in Animist Materialism: Notes on Reading/Writing African Literature, Culture, and Society.” Public Culture, 2003; 15 (2): 261–286.

James, Cyril L. R. The Black Jacobins. New York, N.Y: Vintage, 1989.

Kripal, Jeffrey J. Authors of the Impossible: The Paranormal and the Sacred. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2010.

Sconce, Jeffrey. Haunted Media: Electronic Presence from Telegraphy to Television. Durham: Duke University Press, 2000.

Tinsley, Omise’eke N. Ezili’s Mirrors. Durham: Duke University Press, 2018.

March 4, 2021
by quiparle_admin
Comments Off on Issue 29.2 (December 2020) Is Now Available at Duke University Press!

Issue 29.2 (December 2020) Is Now Available at Duke University Press!

Announcing Volume 29, No. 2 of qui parle, now available through Duke University Press and Project Muse.

Articles:

  • Mohamad Amer Meziane, How the Critique of Heaven Confines the Critique of the Earth
  • Tyrone S. Palmer, Otherwise than Blackness: Feeling, World, Sublimation
  • Ohad Ben Shimon, A Living Community: Theorizing Immunity from the Autoimmune
  • Anna Feuerstein, “South Africa Is the Land of Pet Animals”; or, The Racializing Assemblages of Colonial Pet-Keeping
  • Christopher McGowan, Workers Entering the Prison: Steve McQueen’s Hunger (2008) as Imperial Labor Film

September 21, 2020
by quiparle_admin
Comments Off on Issue 29.1 (June 2020) Is Now Available at Duke University Press!

Issue 29.1 (June 2020) Is Now Available at Duke University Press!

Announcing Volume 29, No. 1 of qui parle, now available through Duke University Press and Project Muse.

Articles:

  • Keith P. Feldman, Carceral Entanglement in the Work of Leila Abdelrazaq
  • Judith Butler, Indefinite Detention
  • Mathias Schönher, The Late Masterwork of Gilles Deleuze: Linking Style to Method in What Is Philosophy?
  • Bruno Penteado, Critical (Dis)pleasure
  • William S. Allen, Blanchot and Lautréamont
  • Kaspar Villadsen, I Assure You, We Have the Strictest Alien Act Possible!: The Emergence of the Concept of “Risky Immigrants” in Denmark

Review Essays:

  • Rajbir Singh Judge, Mind the Gap: Islam, Secularism, and the Law
  • Jonas Teupert, Pact with the People?: Popular Genres, Public Concerns, and the Politics of Representation

February 6, 2020
by quiparle_admin
Comments Off on Fall/Winter 2019 Special Issue, “Trajectories in Race and Diaspora,” now available in print and online!

Fall/Winter 2019 Special Issue, “Trajectories in Race and Diaspora,” now available in print and online!

This special issue, curated by Qui Parle editorial board member Donna Honarpisheh, contains articles by:

  • Michelle Wright
  • Parisa Vaziri
  • Vilashini Cooppan
  • Poulomi Saha
  • Alexis Pauline Gumbs
  • Calvin Warren
  • Jishnu Guha-Majumdar
  • Jonathan Jacob Moore
  • Juana Catalina Becerra Sandoval & Shireen Hamza
  • Introduction by Donna Honarpisheh

Check out the issue at: https://read.dukeupress.edu/qui-parle/issue/28/2

December 21, 2018
by quiparle_admin
Comments Off on Announcing Volume 27:2, December 2018

Announcing Volume 27:2, December 2018

Announcing Volume 27, No. 2 of qui parle, now available in print through Duke University Press, and online through Project Muse, including the special dossier titled “Friendship: Correspondences”.

Articles:

  • Jacques Rancière, The Politics of Fiction
  • Thomas Schestag, Two Incompletes
  • Laura U. Marks, Lively Up Your Ontology: Bringing Deleuze into Ṣadrā’s Modulated Universe
  • David Marriott, The X of Representation: Rereading Stuart Hall

Dossier – Friendship: Correspondences

  • Jessica Ruffin, Friendship: Correspondences: Introduction
  • Thomas Laqueur and Alexander Nehamas, Can a Dog Really Be a Man’s Best Friend?: An Exchange Between Humans
  • Amy Fung-yi Lee and Kiran Chandra, How Do You Draw a Frog?: A Visual Conversation
  • Courtney Sato, “A Picture of Peace”: Friendship in Interwar Pacific Women’s Internationalism
  • Jessica Ruffin and Simone Stirner, Between Friends

Review Essays:

  • Spencer Adams, Staging the Speculative: On Kim Stanley Robinson’s New York: 2140

June 1, 2018
by quiparle_admin
Comments Off on Announcing Volume 27:1, June 2018

Announcing Volume 27:1, June 2018

quiparle_27.1

Announcing Volume 27, No. 1 of qui parle, now available in print through Duke University Press, and online through Project Muse and JSTOR.

Articles:

    • Cesare Casarino, The Expression of Time (Spinoza, Deleuze, Cinema)
    • Jenny Sharpe, Thinking “Diaspora” with Stuart Hall
    • Thomas Nail, The Ontology of Motion
    • Kathleen Biddick, Read Yourself! The Griffin Condition on the Day before
      the Last Day
    • Peter Szendy, Face Value (the Prosopa of Money)
    • Dora Zhang, Notes on Atmosphere
    • Daniel Katz, Robert Duncan and the 1960s: Psychoanalysis,
      Politics, Kitsch
    •  Gary Kafer, Wi-Fi Defiance: Autonomy in the Information Age

Review Essays:

    • Joseph Albernaz, Speculum of the Other Cene
    • Dominick Lawton, Unfinished Trials and Sentences: 1917 at 100

December 23, 2017
by quiparle_admin
Comments Off on Announcing 30th Anniversary Special Issue Volume 26:2

Announcing 30th Anniversary Special Issue Volume 26:2

quiparle_26.2

Announcing Volume 26, No. 2 of qui parle, now available in print through Duke University Press, and online through Project Muse. Cover design from Technologies of Care by Elisa Giardina-Papa.

30th Anniversary Dossier: Who Speaks?:

    • Avital Ronell, The Time of My Life
    • Marianne Constable, When Actions Speak Louder . . .
    • Michael Lucey, On Proust and Talking to Yourself
    • Who Speaks? Thirtieth Anniversary Dossier: Interventions, edited By Patrick Lyons and Simone Stirner
      With interventions from: Jared Sexton • Jean-Luc Nancy • J. Hillis Miller • Lisa Myobun Freinkel • Karen Jacobs • John Culbert Alexander García Düttmann • Michael Naas • Lisa Samuels • Jeff Fort • Ara H. Merjian • Stuart J. Murray and Sara Kendall • Gerhard Richter • Karen Feldman • Alphonso Lingis • Paola Bacchetta • Marjorie Perloff • James Martel • Eli Friedlander • Wayne Koestenbaum • Simon Porzak • John Brenkman • Joseph Vogl • Mieke Bal • Christopher Bracken • Stefanos Geroulanos • Martin Crowley • Michael Marder • Lisa Hofmann-Kuroda

Articles:

    • Helga Tawil-Souri, Checkpoint Time
    • Serguei Alex. Oushakine, How to Grow out of Nothing: The Afterlife of National Rebirth in Postcolonial Belarus
    • Kimberly Juanita Brown, Furia

Literary Works:

    • Pierre Alferi, Fever,  translated by Victoria Bergstrom
    • Jeremy Fernando, A Prayer for Lim Lee Ching
    • Michael D. Snediker, Three Poems

Review Essays:

    • Yuhe Faye Wang,  Performing Race, Speaking the Body: On Asian American Performance Studies and Everyday Racializations
    • Quinn Lester, What about the White People?
    • Donna Honarpisheh, Traces of a Revolution: Reopening the Moment of Contingency in 1979 Iran

June 26, 2017
by quiparle_admin
Comments Off on Announcing Volume 26:1, Spring/Summer 2017

Announcing Volume 26:1, Spring/Summer 2017

Announcing Volume 26, No. 1 of qui parle, now available in print through Duke University Press, and online through Project Muse.

This issue includes:

    • Jean-Luc Nancy, Critique, Crisis, Cri, translated by Patrick Lyons
    • Kristina Mendicino, Before Truth: Walter Benjamin’s “Epistemo-Critical Prologue”
    • Christopher Fynsk, Police Actions in Aesthetics: Rancière Reading Deleuze and Lyotard on Art
    • Bernard StieglerThe New Conflict of the Faculties and Functions: Quasi-Causality and Serendipity in the Anthropocene
    • John Paul Ricco, The Commerce of Anonymity
    • Colin Dayan, Possum Hunting
    • Tina M. CamptPerforming Stillness: Diaspora and Stasis in Black German Vernacular Photography
    • Chris KrausBreaking through Memories into Desire

An interview:

    • Basit Kareem IqbalThinking about Method: A Conversation with Talal Asad

And review essays:

    • Rachel Haejin Lim, Nontranscendental Transnationalism
    • Andrew John Barbour, Liberalism, Disfigured