Difference between revisions of "Lambda function"

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Note that unlike with <code>def</code>, the lambda function does not automatically get bound to a name in the [[frame]] (hence its anonymity). In an [[environment diagram]], a new function is created in the heap when the lambda expression gets evaluated.
 
Note that unlike with <code>def</code>, the lambda function does not automatically get bound to a name in the [[frame]] (hence its anonymity). In an [[environment diagram]], a new function is created in the heap when the lambda expression gets evaluated.
 
 
<!-- A lambda function is lexically scoped, so the new function object's parent is the current frame, the frame in which the lambda expression is evaluated, not the frame where any subsequent call expressions gets evaluated. -->
 
<!-- A lambda function is lexically scoped, so the new function object's parent is the current frame, the frame in which the lambda expression is evaluated, not the frame where any subsequent call expressions gets evaluated. -->
  

Revision as of 18:37, 8 June 2014

A lambda function is an anonymous function; that is, it has no intrinsic name. It is a compact way to define a function inline without using the def statement. Use a lambda function if its body is a simple expression.

Definition

lambda args: return_expression

The lambda expression above in Python is equivalent to the function defined below.

def <lambda>(args):
    return return_expression

Note that unlike with def, the lambda function does not automatically get bound to a name in the frame (hence its anonymity). In an environment diagram, a new function is created in the heap when the lambda expression gets evaluated.

Examples

>>> def call_f(f):
...     return f()
... 
>>> call_f(lambda: 3)
3

You can bind a variable name to a lambda function if you want to refer to it in the future:

>>> even = lambda x: x % 2 == 0
>>> even(40)
True
>>> even(5)
False

You can also call lambda functions like regular functions:

>>> (lambda x: x % 2 == 0)(40)
True

External links