wu :: forums
« wu :: forums - Has anyone seen this before? »

Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register.
Jun 22nd, 2018, 2:02pm

RIDDLES SITE WRITE MATH! Home Home Help Help Search Search Members Members Login Login Register Register
   wu :: forums
   general
   truth
(Moderators: ThudnBlunder, william wu, towr, Grimbal, Icarus, SMQ, Eigenray)
   Has anyone seen this before?
« Previous topic | Next topic »
Pages: 1  Reply Reply Notify of replies Notify of replies Send Topic Send Topic Print Print
   Author  Topic: Has anyone seen this before?  (Read 6951 times)
Benny
Uberpuzzler
*****





   


Gender: male
Posts: 1024
Has anyone seen this before?  
« on: May 7th, 2009, 5:30pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

I came across quite accidentally this forum where it discusses
 
http://eqworld.ipmnet.ru/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=128
 
 
I'm not familiar with "structural geometry"
 
Then, on the same site, I found at  
 
http://eqworld.ipmnet.ru/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=143
 
y = x2 + 16
 
y' at x=3
 
the author finds y'= 10 ... it's quite extraordinary!
Okay, this result is bogus. But what about the so-called "structural geometry" at the first link ?
IP Logged

If we want to understand our world — or how to change it — we must first understand the rational choices that shape it.
towr
wu::riddles Moderator
Uberpuzzler
*****



Some people are average, some are just mean.

   


Gender: male
Posts: 13614
Re: Has anyone seen this before?  
« Reply #1 on: May 8th, 2009, 12:12am »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

There's probably a reason why all replies in that thread are spam.
It's not clear what he's trying to do, nor are his equations even correct in many cases.
IP Logged

Wikipedia, Google, Mathworld, Integer sequence DB
Noke Lieu
Uberpuzzler
*****



pen... paper... let's go! (and bit of plastic)

   
WWW

Gender: male
Posts: 1884
Re: Has anyone seen this before?  
« Reply #2 on: May 8th, 2009, 1:03am »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

It's awesome- it's like a ghost town or something. ) registered users, 1 guest, when I looked.
IP Logged

a shade of wit and the art of farce.
Benny
Uberpuzzler
*****





   


Gender: male
Posts: 1024
Re: Has anyone seen this before?  
« Reply #3 on: Jun 29th, 2009, 12:15pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

We start with 2
The second digit is twice the first, the third is twice the second, etc., with "carries" added in as we go along ...
and then we stop when we find a number starting with 10.
 
................................2                  
..............................42                  
............................842                
........................16842              
......................136842              
......................736842                              
..................14736842                    
..................94736842                  
..............1894736842                          
............17894736842                        
..........157894736842                        
........1157894736842                        
........3157894736842                        
......63157894736842                      
...1263157894736842                      
...5263157894736842                    
105263157894736842  
 
 
Moving the last 2 to the front gives 210526315789473684, manifestly twice 105263157894736842.
 
This blog also contains Dr. Mutalik's explanation of the phenomenon in terms of arithmetic mod 19.
« Last Edit: Jun 29th, 2009, 12:22pm by Benny » IP Logged

If we want to understand our world — or how to change it — we must first understand the rational choices that shape it.
towr
wu::riddles Moderator
Uberpuzzler
*****



Some people are average, some are just mean.

   


Gender: male
Posts: 13614
Re: Has anyone seen this before?  
« Reply #4 on: Jun 29th, 2009, 12:34pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parasitic_number
IP Logged

Wikipedia, Google, Mathworld, Integer sequence DB
Benny
Uberpuzzler
*****





   


Gender: male
Posts: 1024
Re: Has anyone seen this before?  
« Reply #5 on: Jun 29th, 2009, 1:23pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

on Jun 29th, 2009, 12:34pm, towr wrote:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parasitic_number

 
Thanks for the link. These numbers are intriguing.
IP Logged

If we want to understand our world — or how to change it — we must first understand the rational choices that shape it.
Benny
Uberpuzzler
*****





   


Gender: male
Posts: 1024
Re: Has anyone seen this before?  
« Reply #6 on: Jul 14th, 2009, 12:08pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Has anyone done this experiment:
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UB1vd8614gg
 
 
IP Logged

If we want to understand our world — or how to change it — we must first understand the rational choices that shape it.
TenaliRaman
Uberpuzzler
*****



I am no special. I am only passionately curious.

   


Gender: male
Posts: 1001
Re: Has anyone seen this before?  
« Reply #7 on: Jul 14th, 2009, 1:25pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reed%E2%80%93Solomon_error_correction#Data_ storage
 
-- AI
IP Logged

Self discovery comes when a man measures himself against an obstacle - Antoine de Saint Exupery
Benny
Uberpuzzler
*****





   


Gender: male
Posts: 1024
Re: Has anyone seen this before?  
« Reply #8 on: Sep 18th, 2009, 2:57pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Binary Clock
 
It has a detail PDF document
IP Logged

If we want to understand our world — or how to change it — we must first understand the rational choices that shape it.
Benny
Uberpuzzler
*****





   


Gender: male
Posts: 1024
Re: Has anyone seen this before?  
« Reply #9 on: Sep 28th, 2009, 2:09pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Have you seen this book : A = B?
 
 
IP Logged

If we want to understand our world — or how to change it — we must first understand the rational choices that shape it.
Benny
Uberpuzzler
*****





   


Gender: male
Posts: 1024
Re: Has anyone seen this before?  
« Reply #10 on: Oct 13th, 2009, 1:55pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

The Book of Odds is an online statistical encyclopedia.
 
The Book of Odds is a searchable online database of “odds statements,” the probabilities of everyday life.
IP Logged

If we want to understand our world — or how to change it — we must first understand the rational choices that shape it.
Benny
Uberpuzzler
*****





   


Gender: male
Posts: 1024
Re: Has anyone seen this before?  
« Reply #11 on: May 12th, 2010, 7:14pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

I've just read the following: The sum of digits of prime numbers is evenly distributed
IP Logged

If we want to understand our world — or how to change it — we must first understand the rational choices that shape it.
Benny
Uberpuzzler
*****





   


Gender: male
Posts: 1024
Re: Has anyone seen this before?  
« Reply #12 on: Sep 8th, 2010, 10:44pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Furstenberg's Proof of the Infinitude of Primes
 
Quote:
Perhaps the strangest is the following topological proof by Fόrstenberg

 
http://primes.utm.edu/notes/proofs/infinite/topproof.html
 
What makes this proof so strange?
IP Logged

If we want to understand our world — or how to change it — we must first understand the rational choices that shape it.
rmsgrey
Uberpuzzler
*****





134688278 134688278   rmsgrey   rmsgrey


Gender: male
Posts: 2814
Re: Has anyone seen this before?  
« Reply #13 on: Sep 9th, 2010, 7:25am »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

on Sep 8th, 2010, 10:44pm, BenVitale wrote:
Furstenberg's Proof of the Infinitude of Primes
 
 
http://primes.utm.edu/notes/proofs/infinite/topproof.html
 
What makes this proof so strange?

If you look at the other proofs listed on that site, they are all couched in the language of arithmetic. They talk about taking a list of distinct primes (or a list of numbers that represent distinct primes), performing arithmetic operations on them, and producing a number that represents a new prime.
 
The topological proof is, unsurprisingly, couched in the language of topology, so, while it's actually saying pretty much the same thing as the other proofs - that no finite set of primes can cover the integers with their multiples - there will always be some numbers that aren't divisible by any of the primes in the set, it's saying it in an unusual way.  
 
Also, it's a non-constructive existence proof - it doesn't tell you anything about how to find these non-multiples, just that they must exist - the other proofs all tell you where to look for your new prime.
IP Logged
Benny
Uberpuzzler
*****





   


Gender: male
Posts: 1024
Re: Has anyone seen this before?  
« Reply #14 on: Nov 30th, 2011, 2:42pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

A regular expression to check for prime numbers
 
http://www.noulakaz.net/weblog/2007/03/18/a-regular-expression-to-check- for-prime-numbers/
 
IP Logged

If we want to understand our world — or how to change it — we must first understand the rational choices that shape it.
towr
wu::riddles Moderator
Uberpuzzler
*****



Some people are average, some are just mean.

   


Gender: male
Posts: 13614
Re: Has anyone seen this before?  
« Reply #15 on: Nov 30th, 2011, 10:11pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

It actually checks for non-primes Tongue
And it's a bit irregular for a regular expression, since you can't translate it to a finite state machine.
IP Logged

Wikipedia, Google, Mathworld, Integer sequence DB
Pages: 1  Reply Reply Notify of replies Notify of replies Send Topic Send Topic Print Print

« Previous topic | Next topic »

Powered by YaBB 1 Gold - SP 1.4!
Forum software copyright © 2000-2004 Yet another Bulletin Board